I love bookmaking. I love the process and I love the finished piece. I love that it creates a keepsake of sorts, that a collection can be honored and saved. Books make me smile, laugh, cry and I love them for that. Books are made for storing, but also handling and I love being able to hold art in my hands. Did I say I love bookmaking yet?

This session was designed around 2-D works that in a collection would represent a variety of techniques, processes, and mediums. Each week we executed a new project that dried at the studio and was filed into a class folder. The five projects included: tap resist paintings, butterfly prints, collage, watercolor and oil pastel resists, and mono-type printing. On the last day of the session we made book covers decorated with stamping, drawing, and tape design. Each child’s collection was a dramatic presentation of accomplishment and creativity.


I was very pleased with the stamp pads I got from DSS, the ink is vibrant and washes off skin with the wipe of a damp rag.

Hand prints are so fun to make!


The animal set from DSS was equally as awesome as the stamp pads. The big knobs and soft sponge print made it easy for little hands.
I started each class by teaching how to get good print. My method is to dab on the pad “one, two, three times” modeling for the kids how I lift and press onto the color of choice, and then with two hands press down “long and strong”. I try as much as possible to encourage kids to stand to get their full body pressure and control.

We bound the book with simple brass brads. I taught all interested students hole punch safety and allowed them to use this ultra fun tool.

It was magical watching students and parents re-experience six weeks of art making. The pride and recognition that children have for their art, hard work and creativity is powerful.

Photos speak for themselves. What a great session we had!!!


Last year at High Sierra Music Fest they had kiddie pools filled with birdseed for kids to play in together. It was fun to recreate the fun at Studio Sprout!

I made wide mouth funnels (I got the bird seed heavy in texture and the corn and sunflower seeds don’t go through a normal funnel) from bottles I had been saving from the recycling. Notice I taped the rim because after cutting the bottles open the edge was sharp. I also put a variety of scoopers, bowls, and medium size containers for children to sift and sort into.

Bird seed feels cool!


Sensory projects aren’t just about the feeling, they also stimulate imagination, creativity, problem solving, and support teamwork.

The chickens are four weeks old and growing by the day.

The daily handling and love has proven to be effective and the chickens are very patient and docile with the students.